Williams and Walsh - Criminal Defense Overview

Burglary First, Second, or Third Degree

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In South Carolina, there are several degrees of Burglary, and each degree of Burglary has its own specific definition, as shown below. No matter the degree, a Burglary charge is serious, and Williams & Walsh has much experience with these matters. If you are facing a Burglary charge, please contact us today.

SECTION 16-11-311. Burglary; first degree.

(A) A person is guilty of burglary in the first degree if the person enters a dwelling without consent and with intent to commit a crime in the dwelling, and either:

(1) when, in effecting entry or while in the dwelling or in immediate flight, he or another participant in the crime:

(a) is armed with a deadly weapon or explosive; or

(b) causes physical injury to a person who is not a participant in the crime; or

(c) uses or threatens the use of a dangerous instrument; or

(d) displays what is or appears to be a knife, pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun, or other firearm; or

(2) the burglary is committed by a person with a prior record of two or more convictions for burglary or housebreaking or a combination of both; or

(3) the entering or remaining occurs in the nighttime.

(B) Burglary in the first degree is a felony punishable by life imprisonment. For purposes of this section, “life” means until death. The court, in its discretion, may sentence the defendant to a term of not less than fifteen years.

SECTION 16-11-312. Burglary; second degree.

(A) A person is guilty of burglary in the second degree if the person enters a dwelling without consent and with intent to commit a crime therein.

(B) A person is guilty of burglary in the second degree if the person enters a building without consent and with intent to commit a crime therein, and either:

(1) When, in effecting entry or while in the building or in immediate flight therefrom, he or another participant in the crime:

(a) Is armed with a deadly weapon or explosive; or

(b) Causes physical injury to any person who is not a participant in the crime; or

(c) Uses or threatens the use of a dangerous instrument; or

(d) Displays what is or appears to be a knife, pistol, revolver, rifle, shotgun, machine gun, or other firearm; or

(2) The burglary is committed by a person with a prior record of two or more convictions for burglary or housebreaking or a combination of both; or

(3) The entering or remaining occurs in the nighttime.

(C)(1) Burglary in the second degree pursuant to subsection (A) is a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than ten years.

(2) Burglary in the second degree pursuant to subsection (B) is a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than fifteen years, provided, that no person convicted of burglary in the second degree pursuant to subsection (B) shall be eligible for parole except upon service of not less than one-third of the term of the sentence.

SECTION 16-11-313. Burglary; third degree.

(A) A person is guilty of burglary in the third degree if the person enters a building without consent and with intent to commit a crime therein.

(B) Burglary in the third degree is a felony punishable by imprisonment for not more than five years for conviction on a first offense and for not more than ten years for conviction of a second offense according to the discretion of the Court.