Williams and Walsh - Civil Litigation

Drunk Driving Actions / Dram Shop

Charleston, South Carolina Attorneys Experienced in Alcohol-Related Injuries

Personal Injuries Caused by Intoxicated Drivers

Driving under the influence of alcohol or other substances (DUI) – sometimes referred to as operating while intoxicated (OWI) or driving while impaired (DWI) – is reckless and extremely dangerous. Yet, it is one of the most common causes of serious bodily injury and death on our streets and highways.

What is the legal alcohol limit in South Carolina?

In South Carolina, the “legal limit” of a driver’s blood-alcohol content (BAC) is 0.08%. This means that any driver who has a BAC of 0.08% or higher is considered legally intoxicated. Most people who have a BAC of 0.08% would not say that they were drunk; this level is far below the level of “stumbling drunk” that most people associate as evidence of intoxication.

Alcohol affects people in many different ways, depending upon their height/weight, size, age, tolerance to alcohol, how they consumed alcohol, and other factors. It is crucial that you pay close attention to your alcohol intake if you plan to drive. If there is any doubt as to whether you are over the legal limit the best course of action is to find an alternate method for getting home.

If you or a family member has been injured by a drunk driver, Williams & Walsh can assist you in filing a lawsuit seeking recovery of money damages for personal injuries, including, but not limited to, physical injuries and the possibility of recovery for pain and suffering, to compensate for the harm the intoxicated driver caused.

Can someone other than a drunk driver be held liable for my injuries?

In some cases, additional people may be held legally responsible for the injuries caused by a drunk driver. This is sometimes called “tavern-keeper” or “dram shop” liability because most actions are against a bar, restaurant, or other establishment that serves alcohol to an already intoxicated person or to a minor. However, this liability has also been extended to “social host” liability, meaning that anyone, such as the host of a party, who serves alcohol or knowingly allows it to be served to an already intoxicated person (or to minors) could be held liable for the damages caused as a result of alcohol-related accidents.

If you believe that the injuries you or a loved one has suffered in an alcohol-related accident are the result of the driver being improperly served, you should include these additional parties in your lawsuit. The law in this area is not exactly clear and is subject to interpretation, so it is wise to retain experienced professionals like Williams & Walsh to investigate and handle such matters.